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Singer Factories - Anderson, S. Carolina, USA

In 1950 Singer built a new plant in Anderson, South Carolina for manufacturing a new range of slant-needle aluminium bodied sewing machines. Although the plant was officially opened in 1950, production did not start until 1951.

The original models produced at the Anderson plant were the 301/301A, 401A/403A and 500A/503A. With the exception of the first 2 years production of 301’s, machines built at Anderson were identified with an ‘A’ suffix on the model numbers. Serial numbers of machines built at Anderson in the 1950’s and 60’s started with the prefix NA, NB or NC. The parts for these machines were mostly manufactured at the Elizabethport factory and shipped to Anderson for assembly.

After the last 503A was made in 1963 the Anderson plant manufactured power tools and domestic products. After 1975 the ‘Athena’ electronic sewing machines were made at Anderson.

By the 1980’s when Singer ceased to make sewing machines in North America, the Anderson plant continued to manufacture power tools, until on 1st. July 1988 it was sold to Ryobi of Japan, who took over the Singer power tools business.

 

Model dates and serial numbers were:

Model Years From Serial No. To Serial No.
       
301 1951 - 1952 NA000001 NA186000
301A 1953 - 1955 NA186001 NA500000
  " 1956 - 1957 NB000001 NB200000
401A 1957 NA500000 NA900000
  " 1958 NB300001 NB600000
  " 1959 NB700001 NB800000
  " 1960 NB800001 NB900000
  " 1961 NC000001 NC100000
403A 1958 NA900001 NA999999
  " 1959 NB600001 NB700000
  " 1960 NB700001 NB999999
500A 1961 NC100001 NC400000
  " 1962 NC500001 NC600000
  " 1963 NC700001 NC800000
503A 1961 NC200001 NC300000
  " 1962 NC400001 NC500000
  " 1963 NC600001 NC700000

Please note - the above serial numbers and dating details are provided courtesy of Ray at Singer301.com

The Singer301.com website has extremely comprehensive details about all of the early models made at the Anderson factory and so we would encourage you use the link above to visit that site to learn more about the features and the history of these fascinating models.